New semester brings changes among student body

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Addie Salvosa, Staff Reporter

The new semester brings new experiences, especially for all those involved when schedules are changed. Administrators help students find their new classes while students must memorize new classroom locations and meet new people. Nevertheless, all aspects of the new semester takes some getting used to.

Around 600 students changed their schedules this year, and LTHS counselor Joshua Stevens provided some reasons why so many students decide to change their schedules.

“[They] probably have a change of heart on electives and they realize that some core classes are harder than what they expected, or easier, or they might try to join a friend,” Stevens said.

Freshman Abigail Huang dropped an Advanced Placement class due to the high level of difficulty for her and she described how her new schedule did not take much time to adapt to because it only changed slightly.

“It’s [been] pretty quick for me to adjust to my new schedule, because I only had 2 classes that changed,” Huang said. “So the majority of my schedule stayed the same.”

Aysha Franks, a Sophomore, also detailed how her new schedule was not drastically altered and how convenient it now is. 

“My favorite part is that it didn’t change that much, because I don’t have to walk as far now,” Franks said. “I [used to] go all the way to D hall, but now I don’t have to do that. Also, I wanted to keep my schedule the same, so that’s awesome.”

On the other hand, freshman Victoria Nguyen, described some drawbacks from when her schedule was changed due to the rearrangements of many of her classes. 

“I miss seeing my friends the most, but I also miss the convenience of where each class was,” Nguyen said.

Stevens explained how changing a student’s schedule can become stressful and how it is very time-consuming because there are many variables involved.

“It’s been a lot, it takes a lot of time, because if you move one class then you have to move another class,” Stevens said. “It creates a domino effect of changing classes, and it can take 30 minutes to an hour just changing one student’s schedule. We also try to keep classes a balanced size.”

Franks appreciated the counselors’ ability to keep most students’ previous schedules the same as their new ones.

“I think that the school does a good job,” Franks said, “in keeping your schedule the same which I give them props for.”